Capstones 2013

Cameroon deaf empowerment organisation: reflections on an international service-learning capstone
75 pp.; 28 cm., Te'aira Tucker's capstone is a reflection based upon her experience working on a service-learning project in Cameroon, West Africa. As part of her service-learning project, she conducted an internship with a deaf organization, the Cameroon Deaf Empowerment Organisation (CDEO), partnering with this organization through Dr. Berdichevsky's International Deaf Partnerships (IDP) program. Te'aira went to Cameroon during the summer of 2012 initially to work on a HIV/AIDS education campaign focused on deaf Cameroonian women. However, upon arriving, she learned that this initiative was not needed, and therefore, she turned instead to a different and pressing need associated with CDEO and the Ephphatha Institute for the Deaf. From her experiences working with the CDEO, Ms. Tucker decided to work with them on their goal to establish a poultry farm for their deaf school, Ephphatha Institute for the Deaf. The Poultry Farm had several goals, including providing a source of food and income to the school while serving as a means of effective vocational training for the students. The project's vocational training was designed for educating the deaf students to become self-sufficient with marketable skills developed as a result of their experience running the farm. From this experience, Te'aira developed a program for the Clinton Global Initiative - University (CGI-U) for the purpose of educating the deaf community in the United States about the needs of Cameroon Deaf students while also seeking to fundraise and provide support for the Poultry Farm project. Last, Ms. Tucker ultimately hopes her experiences help prepare others who have a desire to conduct service-learning projects in developing countries. She also hopes that she inspires others to make a difference in the world through projects like hers., Submitted by Christopher Shea (christopher.shea@gallaudet.edu) on 2014-09-12T17:43:22Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Te'AiraTuckerCapstone2013.pdf: 1029159 bytes, checksum: 03087187b19a381dfadfec9ade3ff336 (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-09-12T17:43:22Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Te'AiraTuckerCapstone2013.pdf: 1029159 bytes, checksum: 03087187b19a381dfadfec9ade3ff336 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-08-18
Eyeth: a novel for the deaf
279 pp.; 28 cm., Kelsey Young’s science fiction novel Eyeth, to use Tom Humphries’ phrase, is important for deaf literature because it exemplifies “culture talking” not the proof (“talking culture”) of a monolithic culture apart from the mainstream but complex deaf life on its own terms. It also focuses on a wide range of deaf people involved in intra-­deafcentric conflicts; deaf sub-­‐groups include a range of communication preferences (speaking, cued speech, signing) as well as multiple physical differences (deaf-­blind, cerebral palsy, wheelchair users) though not ethnic diversity. A critical introduction to the novel explains that science fiction allows the creation of a world that does not exist as a real physical place and allows exploration of intra-‐group issues that a mainstream context of oppression of all deaf people obscures. The introduction also relates a discussion of the countries on Eyeth to colonialism and post-­colonialism theory to provide a framework to the reader for the subsequent analysis of how Eyeth uses but also subverts colonialist thinking through characters’ actions. The novel itself is about a young man, Virgil G, training under the tutelage of the current Guardian of Eyeth, Shawn Wright, who ensures Eyeth doesn’t stray from its original goals of being a deaf world., Submitted by Seung Hahn (seung.hahn@gallaudet.edu) on 2014-09-15T19:08:48Z No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1089 bytes, checksum: 0a703d871bf062c5fdc7850b1496693b (MD5) KelseyYoungCapstone2013.pdf: 1516046 bytes, checksum: de6f600d64d1d7d2f5cc3b0140a86552 (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-09-15T19:08:48Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1089 bytes, checksum: 0a703d871bf062c5fdc7850b1496693b (MD5) KelseyYoungCapstone2013.pdf: 1516046 bytes, checksum: de6f600d64d1d7d2f5cc3b0140a86552 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-07-05
Hearing the media: an investigation of mainstream media and Deaf/deaf women's body image development
51 pp.; 28 cm., The positive relationship between exposure to mass media and body image disturbances has been well documented. However, for the most part, these studies have focused on the contributions of media exposure on the body image of White women. Recent research suggests that for ethnic minority women, membership of a cultural minority may be a protective factor against internalization of mainstream standards of beauty and the development of body image disturbance; although this protective buffer depends on women's levels of acculturation within their ethnic cultures and their respective levels of acculturative stress. The current paper presents survey data investigating whether these patterns extend to D/deaf women. Data was collected from 96 deaf, female, undergraduate students at Gallaudet University. Results indicate that exposure to mainstream media was not a significant predictor of body image disturbance among deaf women; however, degree of Deaf acculturation, acculturative stress, and internalization of mainstream messages were all significant predictors of body image. Higher levels of internalization and acculturative stress were associated with body image disturbance, while stronger Deaf acculturation was associated with healthier body image. Although stronger Deaf acculturation was predictive of a healthier body image, results do not support the hypothesis that stronger Deaf acculturation helps deaf women resist internalizing mainstream messages. Instead, degree of Deaf acculturation and acculturative stress seem to have a direct path to body image. These results may inform practice with deaf women. Facilitating open discussion of Deaf acculturation status and feelings of marginalization may be especially iportant when working with deaf women., Submitted by Christopher Shea (christopher.shea@gallaudet.edu) on 2014-09-12T17:15:15Z No. of bitstreams: 1 AldalurCapstone2013.pdf: 1083394 bytes, checksum: 20ca3daf6032f9bcdcf0d0ba1463fabb (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-09-12T17:15:15Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 AldalurCapstone2013.pdf: 1083394 bytes, checksum: 20ca3daf6032f9bcdcf0d0ba1463fabb (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-04-12
Observing a residential school for the deaf: identifying factors in creating a deafcentric environment
45 pp.; 28 cm., Among many Deaf education programs in the United States, residential schools for the Deaf have a long and valuable history for the Deaf community as centers of cultural and linguistic transmission of U.S. Deaf culture. Several states maintain well-populated Deaf education programs that provide language and culturally rich environments where Deaf students receive American Sign Language(ASL)/English Bilingual instruction. In such an environment, which could be considered a Deafcentric setting, students are able to interact with their teachers, classmates, principals, and the staff in their native, natural language. Those schools are also designed to provide extracurricular activities with Deaf mentors, another key means of transmitting and nurturing Deaf culture. The purpose of this study is to identify the linguistic and socialization factors -- inside and outside of the classroom -- of one known Deafcentric school in providing quality education that promotes self-advocacy and leadership skills for Deaf students. This research used a simple descriptive qualitative research design, including site observations (two classrooms, an after-school activity, and a dorm tour); interviews with a selected administrator and two educators (one with >15 years of experience and one with <5 years of experience); and document (mission, policies, outreach information) review. The findings suggest the use of visual instructional techniques, the creation of a visual learning environment, the respect for and consistent use of ASL in and out of the classroom, and the positive attitude of teachers and administrators towards providing a bilingual environment are key indicators in creating a Deafcentric environment at this school., Submitted by Christopher Shea (christopher.shea@gallaudet.edu) on 2014-09-12T17:28:39Z No. of bitstreams: 1 AlyssaRomanoCapstone2013.pdf: 1179646 bytes, checksum: aaca5f8f3d976ae99c2961aeac43820f (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-09-12T17:28:39Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 AlyssaRomanoCapstone2013.pdf: 1179646 bytes, checksum: aaca5f8f3d976ae99c2961aeac43820f (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-05-30
Reader's theater for deaf students a tool for developing literacy skills
215 pp.; 28 cm., Reader's theater is a method used in classrooms to encourage the development of literacy skills. Research has shown that the use of reader's theater in a classroom is linked to increased fluency, increased comprehension of text, and positive attitudes towards reading. Because research also shows that Deaf people are often delayed regarding literacy in English, a unit employing this method serves to bridge the gap between expected and actual levels of English literacy among deaf students. Intended for use with Deaf middle school students who sign, this unit of reader's theater is a plausible option in a bilingual approach since it combines American Sign Language and written English. For this unit, three young adult novels containing similar themes--autonomy, medical ethics, and conformity--were selected. Four scenes from each book have been adapted into reader's theater scripts. In addition to a set of four scripts for each book, this reader's theater unit contains a series of classroom discussion questions, classroom activities, and assessment tools. The assessment tools measure changes in the students' literacy skills and attitudes towards reading., Submitted by Seung Hahn (seung.hahn@gallaudet.edu) on 2014-09-15T19:11:35Z No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1089 bytes, checksum: 0a703d871bf062c5fdc7850b1496693b (MD5) SuggsCapstone 2013.pdf: 5095364 bytes, checksum: b6368ef7259c615e3390ffcfc6377d19 (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-09-15T19:11:35Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1089 bytes, checksum: 0a703d871bf062c5fdc7850b1496693b (MD5) SuggsCapstone 2013.pdf: 5095364 bytes, checksum: b6368ef7259c615e3390ffcfc6377d19 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-08-18
Salary differentials based on gender and deafness at the Pennsylvania school for the deaf, 1840 to 1900
48 pp.; 28 cm., Salary differences based on gender are generally known to exist and particularly within the educational workplace; however, deafness can also be a factor in pay difference. This study investigates the stereotype of white, hearing male dominance as well as the assumption of increased discrimination after the triumph of oralism at the Milan Congress of 1880 so that deafness resulted in a greater salary discrimination than gender. Sources include archival documents of financial records and annual reports from the school to Congress of the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf (PSD) from 1840 to 1900. The surprising results of the study add to the historical understanding of oppression in the mid-nineteenth century to the turn of the twentieth century in deaf schools; in particular the results suggest that gender had a greater impact on salary than deafness throughout this period. Perhaps because the reverse is true today, the common assumption has been that deafness has always had a greater negative impact on salary, and particularly so after the Milan Congress. This study analyzes the evidence of discrimination that contradicts these common assumptions about the impact of gender and deafness discrimination in residential schools for the deaf., Submitted by Christopher Shea (christopher.shea@gallaudet.edu) on 2014-09-12T16:47:16Z No. of bitstreams: 1 BrittanyTurnerCapstone2013.pdf: 2176259 bytes, checksum: 56d97960ebf88c613eb8690f8adfc14a (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-09-12T16:47:16Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 BrittanyTurnerCapstone2013.pdf: 2176259 bytes, checksum: 56d97960ebf88c613eb8690f8adfc14a (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-07-17
Sensual cultures: exploring sensory orientation
64 pp.; 28 cm., We use our senses every day, consciously or unconsciously, based on our cultural needs and preferences. These sensory orientations shape and are shaped by what a given culture defines as acceptable. For this reason, different sensory orientations result in different strengths and areas of emphasis and de-emphasis. Becoming aware of different sensory orientations and their associated cultures allows us to realize what we are missing in our own sensory orientations that inform our cultural habits. Familiarity with various sensory orientations may cultivate greater cultural acceptance as well. To analyze and illustrate such differences, an educational app for iPads was created with the software, Adobe InDesign C6 and Digital Publishing Suite. The app displays how cultures use senses of sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste. The cultures of Deaf and hearing people in relation to sensory orientation (aside from other cultural differences among Deaf and hearing people) are the focus. This focus allows the app to illustrates vividly the two modaliites of human languages in the world, an audio-vocal mode and a visual-tactile mode. When humans speak they use audio -vocal gestures, and when they sign they use visual-tactile gestures. Interactions among people using different modalities further illustrate cultural differences resulting from differing sensory orientations. The app includes videos of real-life situations on "H Street NE," a street near Gallaudet University where interactions between hearing and Deaf people are common, as are the misunderstandings arising from the two specific cultural practices. One goal of showing people these different cultural practices along with brief explanations of them in this engaging, hip format is to reduce misunderstandings and increase enjoyment of our diverse public life., Submitted by Christopher Shea (christopher.shea@gallaudet.edu) on 2014-09-12T17:02:30Z No. of bitstreams: 1 LaurenBenedictCapstone2013.pdf: 40103437 bytes, checksum: 543201a6d0cd9891125b516a4c54cfdc (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-09-12T17:02:30Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 LaurenBenedictCapstone2013.pdf: 40103437 bytes, checksum: 543201a6d0cd9891125b516a4c54cfdc (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-04-15
"She stands for freedom": A thematic unit plan for 4th and 5th graders
108 pp.; 28 cm., According to researchers such as Bell (1984) and Fisher (1991), few activities are more powerful for developing historical empathy than engaging students in role-play. This thematic unit plan for fourth and fifth grade children integrates the learning objectives and skills required by the Common Core standards. It consists of a two-act play, The Golden Door, and sample lesson plans that include assessments. Beginning with the Statue of Liberty, the original theatrical work will introduce numerous historical figures as well as interesting historical tidbits, and familiarize students with famous women (as opposed to men), while also allowing teachers an opportunity to address topics such as bullying, stereotypes, gender roles, and multiculturalism. It also lends itself nicely to connections among different subject areas. Examples include introducing a famous woman whose actions are related to the chapter; writing reports on famous American women; using mathematical statistics from the Statue of Liberty to create math problems; introducing Science chapters on erosion/weathering and linking them to the renovation of the Statue of Liberty; exploring the stories of immigrants who arrived at Ellis Island; and researching the stories of the many historical figures introduced during the play. With minimal effort, teachers can link each of their required subjects to the central theme of "Famous Women in American History" and even devote time to subthemes such as "Famous Black Women in American History" or "Famous Women from Virginia in American History.", Submitted by Christopher Shea (christopher.shea@gallaudet.edu) on 2014-09-12T18:02:25Z No. of bitstreams: 1 JeremiahSammonsCapstone2013.pdf: 943243 bytes, checksum: 3358f8a016b6a58fcc91f8b569b96ad9 (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-09-12T18:02:25Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 JeremiahSammonsCapstone2013.pdf: 943243 bytes, checksum: 3358f8a016b6a58fcc91f8b569b96ad9 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-09-14
The unheard needs of the deaf in ecuador
40 pp.; 28 cm., According to the World Federation of the Deaf, at least 90% of deaf people in developing countries are not receiving any education (Hauland & Allen, 2011). Very little research has been done on deaf education in Ecuador specifically. Although some deaf children in Ecuador are receiving an education, their education is impeded by insufficient communication access, lack of government awareness about best practices, and a shortage of teachers with deaf-specific work experience and training. This project provides an analysis of Ecuador’s disabled citizens in general and deaf and hard-of-hearing people in particular, as a context for a focus on education of deaf and hard of hearing students. This focus results in creation of tools to conduct an educational needs assessment at the National Institute for Hearing and Language located in Quito, Ecuador. Needs assessments prioritize issues and propose resolutions to such issues; this one concentrates on services and access as well as the level of instruction for the curriculum at the National Institute for Hearing and Language. With the help of an educational needs assessment, the institution should be able to prepare their students to obtain a higher education or otherwise to improve their opportunities to create more productive and fulfilling lives for themselves and their nation., Submitted by Seung Hahn (seung.hahn@gallaudet.edu) on 2014-09-15T19:13:41Z No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1089 bytes, checksum: 0a703d871bf062c5fdc7850b1496693b (MD5) NatalieDelgadoCapstone2013.pdf: 792372 bytes, checksum: 18b0baa8d106a9407495d5f9a56584bc (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-09-15T19:13:41Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1089 bytes, checksum: 0a703d871bf062c5fdc7850b1496693b (MD5) NatalieDelgadoCapstone2013.pdf: 792372 bytes, checksum: 18b0baa8d106a9407495d5f9a56584bc (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-07-18
Work in Progress
135 pp.; 28 cm., Moving beyond the author’s identity once forged in the family and social expectations of his childhood, a twenty-­‐one year old author weaves a memoir with creative twists that revolves around the theme of coming of age, particularly acceptance of self. Using the second person point of view, the memoir beguiles readers to make the story theirs as well. The preface narrates reasons for composing a memoir, elaborating on how simple, everyday stories become important in creating cohesiveness among different stages of change and growth. The afterword analyzes literary influences that contributed to the author’s style of creative non-fiction and discusses themes, subtexts, symbolism, and foils that express perspective changes. Ultimately, the purpose of the memoir is to portray an exciting work in progress., Submitted by Seung Hahn (seung.hahn@gallaudet.edu) on 2014-09-15T19:17:58Z No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1089 bytes, checksum: 0a703d871bf062c5fdc7850b1496693b (MD5) DerrickBehmCapstone2013.pdf: 1326185 bytes, checksum: 5bca433f3bc0544dde50a59fbd0b635e (MD5), Made available in DSpace on 2014-09-15T19:17:58Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1089 bytes, checksum: 0a703d871bf062c5fdc7850b1496693b (MD5) DerrickBehmCapstone2013.pdf: 1326185 bytes, checksum: 5bca433f3bc0544dde50a59fbd0b635e (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-06-11